A couple of weeks ago I attended the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2017 annual conference. A couple of days ago I finally regained feeling in my feet. I’m no stranger to trade shows or the Orange County Convention Center, but I’m not sure I’ve ever walked so much of the more than 1 million square feet that makes up the OCCC’s West Concourse. HIMSS, with more than 1,200 exhibitors, 300 sessions and 42,000 attendees, is a monster. A benevolent monster, of course, because it’s all about making healthcare smarter and easier and better, and who can argue that’s a good thing?

Workflow is pleased to be a sponsor of the inaugural CapServe conference, April 5-7 in Washington, D.C. We caught up with Bob Zagami, IMAGAZ by ZAGAMI, and Harvey Spencer, HSA, Inc. to find out a little more about this event.

For years, companies have been hard at work analyzing vast amounts of big data trying to uncover insights and trends that help them deliver better business results. But for the most part, they’re only analyzing structured data, the kind that analytics tools can deal with. By making it easier to search for, access, analyze and consume all types of information, including unstructured content from a variety of applications, companies can include more types of data under the big data umbrella – and extract far more value from it.

I recently saw the announcement for Amazon Chime – their new collaboration tool a la Skype. They referenced a Synergy Research Group study about players in the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (Paas) markets – talking about digital workplace products.

Most of the jobs we do require discrete steps, accomplished incrementally over a period, veering from time to time based on input, changes in the environment, and the whims of human nature. (I hate when that human nature thing kicks in.)

Rapid technological advancements are driving big changes in how people work within enterprises of all sizes, across every industry, all around the world. The human resource function isn’t exempt from this change and, in fact, must lead in addressing the impact of workforce challenges and shaping employee experience. To keep pace, HR is being revolutionized by an onslaught of evolving technologies, including cloud, mobile and the Internet of Things – all transforming how HR services are delivered and experienced. While these technologies have been integrated over the last few years, a groundbreaking capability, cognitive computing, is gaining rapid adoption to improve HR decision-making, augment expertise and shape the organization’s culture.

Readers of Workflow magazine are ahead of the crowd when it comes to the concept of digital transformation. Most have first-hand experience at using IT-led automation to accomplish things like opening up process bottlenecks, ensuring policy adherence, and generally getting more done in less time.

Businesses of virtually all sizes and across all industries face an important challenge: the need to better manage physical and electronic records. This due in large part to the explosive growth in the amount of data being created and stored, which is doubling every two years and has already reached immense proportions.1

Much of the focus on business today is on acquiring new customers, but did you know that it costs six to seven times more to land a new customer than it does to sell to an existing one? Your current customers are more profitable too; a repeat customer spends over two-thirds more than a new one, and nearly all customers who have had a great service experience will buy from you again. Clearly, it makes good business sense to keep your existing customers engaged and coming back for more.

The year 2016 brought significant advances in the tech world. Low-code/no-code development platforms started to boom, IoT made its mark in niche areas, and a power shift in enterprise software began. The year 2017 will bring a wave of companies focusing on improving their overall business process management (BPM). Here are a couple of trends to watch out for in 2017.